LITRATO: IMAGES FROM SUGARLANDIA

PAGHANDA PARA SA TIGKALALAG | LITRATO: IMAGES FROM SUGARLANDIA by Julius D. Mariveles

It is known in Hiligaynon as “tigkalalag” – the root word being “kalag” or soul. It is rooted in Roman Catholic tradition owing to the colonization of the country by the Spaniards for more than 300 years.  The American colonization after World War II, which continues until now, has influenced the way we remember the dead today.

It is officially called as the Feast of All Saints and the Feast of All Souls by the Church.  Catholic priest William Saunders, whose article came out in the Catholic Education Resource Center, said these celebrations evolved “independently of paganism and Halloween” although some elements of pagan practices were “perhaps ‘baptized’ by some cultures or attached themselves” to the back-to-back celebrations.

(“All Saints and All Souls” | Catholic Education Resource Center)

What the Roman Catholic Church called as the “pagan” connection referred to the practice of the Celts to mark the November 1 “Samhain” or the beginning of winter.  Samhain was the Celtic lord of death but most importantly, his name meant “summer’s end.”

It is believed that during this time, the souls of the dead cross over the world of the living, presupposing that there is life after death, that we mortals can ultimately triumph over death that most of us fear.

These photos were taken at the Bacolod Public Cemetery located along Burgos Street.

There are more than 3,000 dead here based on records from 2007 to 2011, the cemetery caretaker said.  The yearly rent being charged by the city is P1.50.

SLEEPING AMONG THE ETERNALLY RESTING | A child sleeps as her mother tends to their candle stall inside the Bacolod Public Cemetery in Bacolod City | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

THE GRAVES at the Bacolod Public Cemetery reach up to five stacks high in some parts | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

A YOUNG BOY eats a snack of Indian mango as his mother tends to one of the stalls inside the Burgos Public Cemetery in Bacolod City | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

SOME RELATIVES of the dead have started to clean the graves of their loved ones early at the Bacolod Public Cemetery | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

TOMORROW: Know the story of the former softdrinks salesman who became a laipda maker | Photo by Julius D. Mariveles

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About Hannah|JuliusMariveles

English instructor and broadcast journalist

Discussion

6 thoughts on “PAGHANDA PARA SA TIGKALALAG | LITRATO: IMAGES FROM SUGARLANDIA by Julius D. Mariveles

  1. It takes a really skilled photographer to take pictures of everyday things and come up with a beautiful picture story. Nice juxtaposition of two kinds of “slumber” there. Keep taking pictures, please. We need more of these.

    Posted by Brian Herbert | October 24, 2011, 12:43 pm
  2. i enjoy the foto side of the blog, and the reveiws too… beautiful pics… love this!

    Posted by Hera Meister | October 24, 2011, 12:45 pm
  3. nice pics, sir. The colors are standing out. my fave is the kid eating a mangoes… as usual, the pics tells a story, not just random shots of cemeteries.

    Posted by Dean Devlin | October 25, 2011, 4:55 am

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